By admin at Feb. 4. 2012.

      Gardeners have always been advised to plant hybrid tea roses with the bud graft above the soil. This is generally the way all grafted trees and bushes are planted. The point of grafting is to give a hybrid plant, that may not have the best root system, a better chance of survival by giving it the root system of one of its sturdier cousins.

      The theory is that in planting the graft below the soil line you are encouraging the development of roots from the less hardy hybrid and exposing thegraft to conditions that can do it damage such as excess moisture, bacteria and fungi.

       Growers are now suggesting that bud grafts on hybrid teas be planted at least 2 inches or more below the ground in colder areas. Some recommend putting them 4-6 inches below the surface. This gives the bud graft a better chance of survival in colder climates. A dead bud graft means no more hybrid tea rose. The grafted roots will survive and the canes they put up in the spring will bear the wild roses that are their natural flower.

      The bushes will still need the protection of rose cones, piled up leaves or some other means of protecting the canes from desiccation and freezing during cold winter weather. Winter protection in our area should be piled up leaves or soil covered by a ridged cone. Canes should be cut back to no more than 18 inches long and it is safest to spray them with a fungicide before covering them with leaves or soil. If your roses are prone to diseases peat moss might make a better covering as it discourages fungal and bacterial growth. Remove coverings in early spring. Late frosts are less danger to the canes than excess moisture in the covering medium. Growing hybrid teas is an exercise in frustration in our area. It is simply easier to go with the Knock-out roses, floribundas, rugosas or other hardy bush roses. Many of them now are repeat bloomers and will provide beautiful flowers throughout the summer. Still, if you are dedicated to the near perfect flower forms of some of the hybrid teas, try planting them deep.

      Growers are now suggesting that bud grafts on hybrid teas be planted at least 2 inches or more below the ground in colder areas. Some recommend putting them 4-6 inches below the surface. This gives the bud graft a better chance of survival in colder climates. A dead bud graft means no more hybrid tea rose. The grafted roots will survive and the canes they put up in the spring will bear the wild roses that are their natural flower.

      The bushes will still need the protection of rose cones, piled up leaves or some other means of protecting the canes from desiccation and freezing during cold winter weather.  Winter protection in our area should be piled up leaves or soil covered by a ridged cone. Canes should be cut back to no more than 18 inches long and it is safest to spray them with a fungicide before covering them with leaves or soil. If your roses are prone to diseases peat moss might make a better covering as it discourages fungal and bacterial growth. Remove coverings in early spring. Late frosts are less danger to the canes than excess moisture in the covering medium.

      Growing hybrid teas is an exercise in frustration in our area. It is simply easier to go with the Knock-out roses, floribundas, rugosas or other hardy bush roses. Many of them now are repeat bloomers and will provide beautiful flowers throughout the summer. Still, if you are dedicated to the near perfect flower forms of some of the hybrid teas, try planting them deep.

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